Shenandoah River State Park overlook

Shenandoah River State Park

The Raymond R. Andy Guest Jr. Shenandoah River State Park is one of Virginia's newest state parks. Located just downstream from Bentonville, the park boasts over five miles of frontage on the South Fork of the Shenandoah River. These waters eventually flow into the Chesapeake Bay. The park consists of pastures, forests and vistas of the mountains and the river.

Wildlife you are likely to see during your visit may include black bears, wild turkeys, white-tailed deer, raccoons, foxes, beavers and skunks just to name a few. In addition, there are many types of birds, insects, snakes, trees and plants. April and May are good times to look at the wildflowers and catch part of the spring bird migration. This is also a good time to fish for smallmouth bass and channel catfish in the river. These species are two of the most sought after fish in the South Fork of the Shenandoah River.

During the summer months, the park hosts many interpretive programs that promote conservation of the river and create an awareness of how important it is to protect the river and Chesapeake Bay watersheds.

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Hours

The park is open year-round from 8:00 AM to dusk.

(Note: Many places fill to capacity on busy, nice weather days, especially holiday weekends. Please call ahead or visit the official website to get the most up-to-date information before visiting.)

Fees

The park has a daily parking fee of $10 for residents and $12 for out of state visitors

History

The first component of Shenandoah River State Park was the 922-acre Jeni Tract, which was acquired in 1994 as part of a 1992 state bond referendum. In addition to the Jeni tract, other properties acquired for the park include the Maddox tract (171 acres), Hidalgo tract (7 acres), Parsall tract (22 acres), the Cullers tract (484 acres), and a tract from Norfolk and Southern of about 15 acres.

Activities

The park fosters fishing, hiking, biking, horseback riding, picnicking, camping, wildlife observation, interpretive programs,and has access to the South Fork of the Shenandoah River.

Facilities

The park has a cartop canoe launch, an access sites to the river, nine primitive campsites with a bathhouse, four picnic shelters.

Drinks and snacks are available at the visitor center.

Accessibility

  • The lodge, cabin 2 and cabin 5 are universally accessible.
  • Although motorized vehicles are not permitted on park trails, electric wheelchairs and electric scooters that meet the federal definition for wheelchairs are allowed to enable people with disabilities to use the trails.
  • All picnic shelters are accessible via paved sidewalks. Day use restrooms are also accessible. Shelters feature wheelchair accessible picnic tables.
  • Unpaved paths leading to campsites, vault toilets and the bathhouse are covered with natural wood chips. Bathhouse toilets have rails, but vault toilets do not.
Main image: Michael Land / Michael Land Photography
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